Bees Top Rainiers

first_img FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmail(Tacoma, WA) — Kaleb Cowart racked up four hits and three RBI as the Bees topped the Rainiers 7-5 in Tacoma.Matt Thaiss and Ryan Scott each clubbed home runs and Parker Bridwell earned the win in relief.The Bees continue their series in Tacoma tonight. July 1, 2019 /Sports News – Local Bees Top Rainiers Written by Robert Lovell Tags: PCL/Salt Lake Beeslast_img

Pediatric Radiologist

first_imgPosition Responsibilities Diversity Statement Information School/UnitSchool of Medicine DepartmentRadiology Interested applicants should apply online athttps://www.vcujobs.com. Proposed Hire Date07/01/2018 The mission of the Department of Radiology is to reaffirm andelevate the status in the medical center and nation by providinghigh quality, specialized radiological services and by buildingupon the existing research structure.The vision is to create a department that is recognized as top tiernationally and internationally. Is this employee on a H1B Visa? Number of Months12 Mission or Goal of Unit Supplemental QuestionsRequired fields are indicated with an asterisk (*). Type of SearchNational To provide specialized diagnostic radiology – pediatric imaginginterpretation, including CT, US, GI/GU, fluoroscopy, MR andinterventional procedures, with the use of state-of-the-artequipment. This full-time pediatric radiology position will trainresidents within the large, highly productive academic radiologydepartment. Chief purpose of this position in support of above mission orgoal * If you selected ‘Other’ for your referral source pleaseindicate where you heard about this posting. (If you did not select’Other,’ please enter ‘n/a.’)(Open Ended Question) Required Qualifications Position NumberF59290 RankAssistant Professorcenter_img Application Deadline Date Preferred Qualifications Date Posted10/16/2017 Grant funded position?No 1. Teaching – Provide training to medical students, residents andfellows who rotate through the Department of Radiology.2. Research – Continue to promote professional relationships withall pediatric subspecialties to foster interdisciplinaryresearch.3. Service – See below.4.Clinical – Provide high quality sub-specialized imaginginterpretations for assigned modalities in support of the referringphysicians and patients of the VCUHS . Responsibilities include allfacets of pediatric radiology (conventional radiographs, CT, MR,US, fluoroscopy and CT and US interventions). Special interest orskills in acute care imaging and oncology. Applicant DocumentsRequired DocumentsCurriculum Vitae (CV)Optional DocumentsCover Letter/Letter of ApplicationReference Letter – 1Reference Letter – 2Reference Letter – 3 Open Until FilledYes Posting DetailsEmployees hired into Administrative and Professional positionsposted on or after July 1, 2017, will be governed by and, ifemployed on July 1, 2018 will move into the new University HumanResources System. For additional information, go tohttp://greatplace.vcu.edu. Tenure StatusNon-Tenure Eligible Position TypeTeaching and Research Faculty * How did you find out about this position?Alumni association magazineChronicle of Higher EducationCommunity eventEmail notificationHERC (Higher Ed Recruitment Consortium)Higher education publicationInternal RecruiterJob fairJob site (e.g. Monster.com)ListservNewspaperProfessional association/journalReferred by person/employeeSearch firm notificationVCU vacancy listing – eJobsOther Posted Salary • Demonstrated experience working in and fostering a diversefaculty, staff, and student environment or commitment to do so as afaculty member at VCU .• Applicants should have ABR certification or documentation ofpassing the Core Component of the ABR Board examination and befellowship trained in pediatric radiology. Quick Linkhttps://www.vcujobs.com/postings/67294 Working TitlePediatric Radiologist Application Process/Additional Informationlast_img read more

University Park Mall set to reopen on Saturday May 2

first_img Pinterest Google+ CoronavirusIndianaLocalNationalNews WhatsApp Twitter By Tommie Lee – April 28, 2020 5 783 WhatsApp University Park Mall set to reopen on Saturday May 2 The parking lot for the University Park Mall in Mishawaka sits empty, April 2020. (Tommie Lee) The University Park Mall will be open for limited hours, starting Saturday.The Simon Property Group announced Tuesday that they will be reopening 49 malls around the country this weekend, including the University Park Mall on Grape Road in Mishawaka.Beginning May 2nd the mall will be open from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m., and from noon to 6 p.m. on Sundays.Each retailer will be deciding if they want to reopen for business.Simon is encouraging all of their retailers to implement safety precautions and offer personal protection materials to their customers. Certain social distancing precautions will be taken around the mall.The mall reopening is dependent on any changes to the stay at home order. Facebook Previous articleAntibodies will be key in loosening Indiana’s COVID-19 restrictionsNext articleIndiana reports 1st death of prison guard with coronavirus Tommie Lee Pinterest Google+ Twitter Facebooklast_img read more

Lafa Taylor Adapts Tokyo Train Jingle Into New Single ‘Tokyo Trap’

first_imgHip hop/electronica artist Lafa Taylor has taken an interesting approach to his newest single, reworking a popular train jingle in Tokyo into its own trap beat for a brand new release. Aptly titled “Tokyo Trap,” the song finds Taylor not only remixing the jingle, but laying down some raps over the newly-created beat.The result is an infectious new groove, which Lafa Taylor released as a single for your listening pleasure, below: There’s also a mini-music video released by Lafa Taylor, shot entirely on his phone! Stream it below: For more Lafa Taylor, be sure to check out our recent interview with the rising star from Envision Festival in Costa Rica. You can watch that here. Lafa Taylor – Tokyo Trap Mini Music VideoLafa takes Tokyo’s most popular train jingle and makes a trap beat out of it, then raps to it, then shoots a video for it with his phone. #Japan #magicmondayPosted by Lafa Taylor on Tuesday, March 29, 2016last_img read more

Inside Rising Appalachia’s Socially Conscious Approach To Live Music

first_imgSisters Chloe Smith and Leah Song, along with percussionist Biko Casini and bassist/guitarist David Brown, have created a grassroots musical revolution with their band Rising Appalachia. The band’s folk-driven melodies are backed by a dedication to affecting positive change, using their nationwide touring to work with local communities across the country. It was Leah who coined the term “Slow Music Movement,” the campaign by which Rising Appalachia is able to give back and inspire real social change.We had the opportunity to check in with the band as they continue their battle against the wastefulness of touring, hitting like-minded festivals including the upcoming Symbiosis Gathering, which runs from September 22-25 (more info here). As Symbiosis co-owner Kevin KoChen explains, “we are participants in a movement that skews away from products and services owned by multi-national corporations. It’s common sense and a central tenet of permaculture, ‘earth care, people care, and fair share’.” Read on to learn all about the Movement, and everything going on with Rising Appalachia!L4LM: How were you inspired to create the “Slow Music Movement”? Was there a particular moment, or was it something that grew after spending years on the road?Leah: The Slow Music Movement was a term that I coined while I was prepping for a Ted X talk a little while ago. I wanted to discuss our ways of touring and moving through 12 years of music. Alternative touring has always been a priority of our music project. We tour independently and creatively, have remained self-managed, and have ALWAYS had a relationship with local communities on the ground as often as we can, but when we gave a voice and a title to that intention it became much more powerful. Hence the Slow Music Movement.The Slow Music Movement is an effort to bring in local outreach to each event, reduce single-use waste at shows, source farm-to-table food for backstage, and continue to create and promote sustainable touring practices within the music industry. It’s our effort to take the glitz and glam out of the music industry and bring performance back to its roots – that of public service- where musicians are not just part of a fast-paced entertainment world, but instead influence the cultural shift of communities as troubadours, activists, story tellers, and catalysts of justice.L4LM: Do you see this as the natural progression from your recent tour via train?Leah: Sustainable and alternative travel has been a part of our greater mission from the get go of Rising Appalachia… How can we create a music that reaches beyond the stereotypical bar and club scene and create a way to make music a social service and a public affair… Rail travel was such a natural extension of our investigations in alternative transit… Can rail travel in the US be a sustainable option, and can we use a resource that already exists to launch into a more reliable and publicly available mass transit option? That’s what the train tour was all about. David, our guitarist, got deeply invested in the research and leg work to actually make the tour possible.David: We have toured in other parts of the world via rail and have loved it immensely. We didn’t really know that train travel in the states was a real option until I read a Harper’s article about passenger trains a couple years ago (ironically, while on layover in an airport). Trains appeal to us because we want to ‘walk our talk’ – we have messages about “scaling down” in our music, encouraging folks to drive less, build local relationships, etc, and we want to keep it real as we become a better known and sought after band. The amount of driving and flying that most bands do is really unappealing to us, so its cool to find a means of travel that suits our values more. Pursuing a train based tour really seemed like a powerful step for us towards the kind of world we want to be living in.Biko: Our intentions in undergoing the rail tour was to see for ourselves what rail touring was like. Is it a feasible method of transportation? What does it feel like? This nation was originally built by rail, but most people alive today do not remember traveling the nation by train. If the young people of today are going to be inspired to ride trains, it will be because it seems like trains are a step forward… not because they are looking nostalgically backwards. The challenge facing the passenger rail industry today is to capture peoples imagination by how green rail travel is, and the implications it will have on our experience of travel in the future. We aim to inspire people with what rail travel is, and what it can be.L4LM: Tell us about some of the logistics behind the Slow Music Movement. What work is being done on the ground, and how does it happen?Leah: We work in strong partnership with a multitude of activist organizations…We have continued involvement in important campaigns along our touring routes, such as the “Love Water Not Oil” campaign with Winona LaDuke and the Ojibwe tribe last year working to educate the nation on pipeline proposals at the headwaters of the Mississippi river. We have worked for years with the School of Americas Vigil which is working to close down a federally funded para-military institute in Columbus, GA, tied to human rights abuses around the world. We have toured and worked in partnership with Mountain Justice initiates (putting an end to mountain top removal), dam removals, restorative justice work, and international arts education…among many other things. The lists are lengthy and we each have our own personal politics, but I think the main crossroads for us is using music as a tool and a catalyst for betterment in our communities, and as a platform for dialog around justice issues in our world. That means that the music is always available to be a resource for social change.And yes, we do see progress…in that Slow Movement kind of way. We see progress on a one-on-one basis, when a mountain is saved, or a new song learned, or a return to a landscape is written about. We see progress when someone comes up after a show and says “I want to use my voice for things I believe in” or “thank you because I haven’t danced like that for a long time because I was sick, and its powerful to feel my body move again” or “I decided to quit my job and go into at-risk-youth counseling and I thank you for the courage to make a difference”… or any of the myriads of things that we learn from our powerful fans about how they are each touched to make changes in their own lives. We all need that momentum from each other to live in a fully integrated way. That is the most valuable kind of progress.L4LM: What is the best way for someone to get involved with the Movement?Chloe: Reach out to us if we are coming to your town and lets get the conversation going early about what is happening locally. What initiatives are being pushed. What environmental or social justice movements need to be voiced or gathered around. If you are a local nonprofit or organizer, we want to hear from you ! We are also always looking to source local fresh farm food and apothecaries around our concerts in order to sustain our own health and wellness on the road, so send suggestions ! Rising Appalachia is invested in creating a larger network around our music that helps this massive burst of energy we create with music stay grounded and in service to things much larger than ourselves… which means all hands on deck.L4LM: How do you want to see the Slow Music Movement project grow from here?Leah: We hope for the Slow Music Movement to become a platform that will grow around our intentions to continue pushing music into many realms of grassroots organizing and old school public service, and will also provide a blue print for other artists to utilize for alternative music industry options. Alternative transportation options like trains, boats, horses, bicycles. Food that is sourced locally and grown with care and intention. A platform to share ideas and give voice to the many interwoven global concerns of justice and protection of all things wild. We hope that it will grow much bigger than us.L4LM: Musically speaking, what is your next step for RA after the success of ‘Wider Circles’? Is anything in the works?Leah: We are very content to still be playing the music in our collection, and it is still very fresh and inspiring to pull onto the stage. We are slowly cooking up new ideas with influence from trip-hop, hip-hop, and transformational funk.Currently, Arouna Diarra, an amazing folk musician from Burkina Faso, has been performing more and more frequently with us. He is one of the teachers of Biko who met him in Africa and studied with him here in the states. Diarra is amazing holder and curator of music and we look forward to artistically collaborating more and more with him. He’ll be with us at Symbiosis!Chloe: Collaboration will be key in the coming years. There is talk of remix collaborations in the future as well as EP’s with some favorite folk artist friends. Right now it is less about producing more Rising Appalachia albums and more about opening up our artistic circles and seeing what we can co-create with other artists. Wider Circles is indeed a potent album for the times still and we are loving diving into the depths of its sound and finding the hidden gems inside.last_img read more

U.S. hospitals making only modest gains in adoption of electronic health records

first_imgTransforming the U.S. health care system from paper-based to electronic-based may improve health care quality and reduce costs, but a new study in Health Affairs by researchers from the Harvard School of Public Health (HSPH) suggests that goal is far off. The adoption of basic or comprehensive electronic health records (EHR) by U.S. hospitals increased modestly from 8.7% in 2008 to 11.9% in 2009, but only 2% of hospitals met the federal “meaningful use” standard needed to qualify for government financial incentives.The researchers also found that smaller, rural, and public hospitals fell further behind their larger, private, and urban counterparts in adopting EHRs, further widening the gap between the two groups in receiving the benefits of health information technology.“Getting hospitals to start using EHRs is critical,” said lead author Ashish Jha, associate professor of Health Policy and Management. “Paper-based medical records lead to hundreds of thousands of errors each year in American hospitals and probably contribute to the deaths of tens of thousands of Americans. This is not acceptable. There is overwhelming evidence that EHRs can help, yet the expense and the disruption that implementing these systems can cause has forced many hospitals to move slowly.”The researchers drew from a survey by the American Hospital Association, which asked 4,493 acute-care non-federal hospitals about their health information technology efforts as of March 1, 2009; 3,101 (69%) responded. A representative from each hospital reported on the presence or absence of 32 clinical functions of an EHR and how widely they had been implemented throughout the hospital. Responses were statistically adjusted to balance for hospitals that did not respond.They found that hospitals’ adoption of basic or comprehensive EHR systems increased by 3.2% between 2008 and 2009. Based on the measures examined by the authors, only approximately 2% of U.S. hospitals described EHRs that would allow them to meet the criteria in the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act for “meaningful use,” which doctors and hospitals must meet by 2012 in order to receive financial incentives through Medicare and Medicaid reimbursements. These meaningful use guidelines include 14 core functions, such as prescribing electronically and keeping an active medication list for patients.Given the state of the economy at the time the survey was conducted, Jha is not surprised that adoption rates for EHR systems, which can cost tens of millions of dollars to purchase and implement, remain low. He notes that the government’s financial incentives may go primarily to larger, academic hospitals, further widening an already large digital divide.“The problem is that the bonuses that hospitals get for meeting meaningful use are front-loaded, meaning hospitals have to implement and use EHRs by 2012 in order to get the bulk of the incentives,” Jha said. “This is an aggressive timeline, and many hospitals may not make it. If they miss out, it may be years before many of these hospitals will be able to afford to purchase and install their own EHR systems.”last_img read more

What’s in a face?

first_imgWhen you meet people for the first time, what’s the first thing you think you notice? Is it their hair color, or eye color? Maybe it’s whether they’re wearing a suit or a T-shirt and jeans, or whether they have a firm handshake.But your brain, Harvard researchers say, immediately takes note of two key characteristics: their race and gender.Using real-time scans of the brain, recent Harvard Ph.D. Juan Manuel Contreras, Richard Clarke Cabot Professor of Social Ethics Mahzarin R. Banaji, and Psychology Professor Jason P. Mitchell found a brain region in which patterns of neural activity change when people look at black and white faces, and at male and female faces. The study is described in a paper published last month in the journal PLOS ONE.“We found that a brain region called the fusiform face area, or the FFA for short, seems to play a key role in differentiating faces along these two dimensions,” said Contreras, the study’s first author, who earned his doctorate in psychology. “When we studied the patterns of activation in this region, we found they were different for black and white faces, and for female and male faces.”Interestingly, Contreras said, the fact that those patterns appear in the FFA, which earlier studies had shown to be active just 200 milliseconds after seeing a face, suggests that differences in race and sex are parsed early in visual perception. While the brain seems to be collecting information about race and sex, Contreras said, it’s not until later in visual processing that meaning is attached to those differences.“It’s important to note that previous research suggests the FFA does not endow visual stimuli with meaning, so it probably does not know anything about sex and race. It’s simply a brain region in the visual system that sees faces as belonging to two different sets,” Contreras said. “The information is simply being gathered, and is then handed off to other parts of the brain that begin to process what those differences mean — other regions that have information about what men and women are like or what it means for a face to belong to a black person or a white person”To understand how the brain gathers that information and begins to process it, Contreras and his colleagues turned to functional magnetic resonance imaging, or fMRI, a technique that allows researchers to monitor changes in blood flow in the brain in real time.After placing participants in a scanner, the subjects were shown a series of images on a computer screen. For some images, the participants were asked to identify whether the faces were male or female, and for others whether the faces were black or white.“We take images every few seconds,” Contreras explained. “Using statistical analysis, we can identify patterns of neural activity that correspond to different social categories. We could then look for differences in those patterns between the faces of blacks and whites, and between the faces of men and women.“We also found evidence that, when we asked participants to pay attention only to the sex of a person, this region was still recognizing race. When we told them to pay attention to race, the FFA was still recognizing sex, so it appears as though this region is constantly categorizing faces by sex and race.”The question now facing researchers, Contreras said, is why.One possible reason is that, whether for evolutionary or developmental reasons, it can be important to know the sex and race of other people, especially in contexts in which those differences should change the way in which you interact with them.“Sex and race can be important things to know about another person, so it would make sense that as soon as you see another person, you need to know figure out the social categories to which they belong,” Contreras said.“What’s interesting is that the FFA is also believed to be involved in some aspects of processing identity,” he added. “Obviously, characteristics that are inextricably linked to you, like your race and your sex, are part of identity. Other scientists have shown that we perceive identity by perceiving the sex and race of faces, and what we’re showing here is a sort of neural correlate of that. If this region is responsible for identity processing, it might make sense that it’s also responsible for recognizing race and sex differences.”last_img read more

Students walk out of 2017 Commencement ceremony

first_imgThe opening words of Vice President of the United States and 2017 Commencement speaker Mike Pence’s speech were drowned out by a chorus of boos from members of the audience at Notre Dame’s 172nd Commencement ceremony Sunday. Those boos, however, were largely in response to a group of approximately 100 graduates who chose to stand and exit Notre Dame Stadium as Pence started speaking.Rather than listen to Pence’s Commencement speech, this group of graduates pledged to walk out of the ceremony and host their own informal ceremony just outside the stadium. A press release sent out by We Stand For — a student group dedicated to drawing attention to social justice issues — said the purpose of the walkout was to stand “in solidarity with all members of the Notre Dame community affected by the policies advocated by U.S. Vice-President Mike Pence,” citing groups such as the LGBT community and religious minorities as those members. Emmett Farnan Students sit through the 2017 Commencement ceremony. While the walkout drew national attention, most students and family members did not participate.Hoyt said he was glad that, aside from the walkout, the focus of the ceremony remained on accomplishments of the class of 2017.“I think there were some random potshots taken at times, and I was kind of surprised in the middle of speeches, but I think most of it was focused on us,” he said. “I didn’t feel it was over-politicized or anything. It seemed pretty appropriate.”Some of these political moments occurred during Valedictorian C.J. Pine’s Valedictory Address, in which he urged his classmates to “fight for others, for their unalienable rights.”“Our generation must stand against the scapegoating of Muslims,” he said. “Our concern for freedom of religion must mean freedom for all religions — not just our own — otherwise none of us is free. We must commit ourselves to make certain that all of our friends and classmates at Notre Dame receive equal rights and respect when they leave this stadium with us.”Pine’s remarks drew praise from 2017 Laetare Medal recipient Fr. Greg Boyle of Homeboy Industries. Boyle echoed Pine and told the class of 2017 not to be discouraged from their mission to serve others.“You imagine with God a circle of compassion, and then you imagine nobody standing outside that circle,” he said. “You go from here to dismantle the barriers that exclude. … We go to the margins, and indeed you have to brace yourselves, because people will accuse you of wasting your time.”Throughout his speech, Pine — a Truman Scholar and a Gilman Scholar — touched on additional subjects, such as the Syrian refugee crisis and the current political climate in the U.S., noting that Notre Dame students are called to serve others after graduating.“Our calling as we leave this stadium is to get these gowns dirty together, as we wade into muddy waters, as our learning becomes service to justice,” he said. “When we follow the deeper callings of justice and proclaim the deeper magic of love and sacrifice that connect all of us — no matter which corner of the world we come from — then we will be true to what we have learned at Notre Dame.”Pine’s speech served as extra encouragement for some students considering participating in the walkout. Liz Hynes, who graduated with a degree in film, television and theatre, said Pine’s call to service to justice spoke to her motivations and the motivations of others who walked out with her.“I think after listening to C.J. Pine’s speech, if you were on the fence about walking out you were no longer on the fence,” she said. “He nails it. What is so important about most religions — and Catholicism, in particular — is helping the marginalized and just living a life of service. And I know that a lot of people will think that this was just a bunch of liberal snowflakes trying to make themselves feel good about themselves at graduation, but I really think that there’s a deeper empathy that we’re all trying to tap into.”With Notre Dame’s “tradition of peaceful protest” in mind, Hynes said she was taken aback by the response to the walkout from the crowd.“There were slurs shouted at people,” she said. “ … There were some really nasty things hurled at people, and it really validated why we were doing this. It really, I think, emboldened us to keep going and keep walking out, because that kind of behavior has really been resurging in a troubling way since this administration has taken office, and it’s not acceptable.”After discussing President Donald Trump’s dedication to religious freedom, Pence addressed the subject of free speech during his speech, saying it was “waning on campuses across America.”“Notre Dame is a campus where deliberation is welcome, where opposing views are debated and where every speaker — no matter how popular or unfashionable — is afforded the right to air their views in the open, for all to hear,” Pence said. “But Notre Dame is the exception — an island in a sea of conformity, so far spared from the noxious wave that seems to be rushing over much of academia. While this institution has maintained an atmosphere of civility and open debate, far too many campuses across America have become characterized by speech codes, safe zones, tone policing, administration-sanctioned political correctness — all of which amounts to nothing less than the suppression of freedom of speech.”Watkins said she felt these remarks from Pence and the response of the crowd to the walkout were hypocritical.“I think there is a great hypocrisy of those that call for free speech and then boo any demonstration of free speech or freedom of expression,” she said. “ … We were completely respectful in quietly getting up and exiting as quickly as possible. The real interruption was the loud chorus of boos coming from the stands. It just shows that their argument isn’t really about being respectful to Vice President Pence when that’s how they would react.”Pence ended his speech by advising the class of 2017 to remain true to the Catholic values taught by the University.“If you hold fast to Him, to the faith you’ve deepened in this place and to all you’ve learned and the examples you’ve seen, I know you will not only persevere, you will prevail, and you will lead your families, your professions and our country to unimaginable heights,” he said. “University of Notre Dame class of 2017, this is your day. So go Irish. The future is yours.”Hynes said although she chose to walkout in response to the invitation of Pence, she has a deep appreciation and love for Notre Dame, and is proud to have graduated from the University.“We love Notre Dame so much, and I think that part of why protests happen is because when the things you love disappoint you, you want to work to make them better,” she said. “ … I’m so grateful to the school. It’s changed my life, it’s made my life in so many ways. … It was really cool that we weren’t stopped. I don’t think that every school would’ve been as willing to walk the walk in terms of promising free speech to its students. Notre Dame really followed through, and we appreciate that.”Tags: Caleb Pine, Commencement 2017, Fr. Greg Boyle, Mike Pence, protest, walkout, walkoutND Emma Farnan | The Observer Students participate in a walk out during Vice President Mike Pence’s speech at Commencement. Approximately 150 students, friends and family members participated in the walkout.Tommy Favorite, who graduated with a degree in film, television and theatre, said he chose to participate in the walkout to support those who he believes are marginalized by Pence’s policies, but it was a difficult decision for him to make.“I had to do a lot of thinking about the benefits of staying and going,” he said. “ … I’m not the kind of person whose health, or safety or dignity is being threatened by this administration, but I know when I care about so many people who do — and regardless of who I know and who I talk to — it’s about recognizing and perceiving injustice and reacting to it.”Fellow participant Grace Watkins — a Rhodes Scholar who graduated with a degree in philosophy with a minor in philosophy, politics and economics — said the walkout was intended to demonstrate dissatisfaction with the University’s choice of Pence as Commencement speaker as well as Pence’s policies.“I knew I wanted to do something to show how strongly I disagreed with Pence’s policies and the school’s decision to invite him,” she said. “ … The purpose of the protest itself was to highlight our disagreement and revulsion at his policies. I personally believe he shouldn’t have been invited.”Jessica Pedroza, one of the organizers of the walkout who graduated with a degree in political science, said she was proud to see how many students participated in the walkout.“It took a lot of courage, I think, for a lot of people to walk out,” Pedroza said. “It was a very emotional moment, [and] it was a very important moment for us. … So I think to all of the students who walked out — who are going to get a lot of hate messages today and in the future — I think everyone should be really proud of having walked out on such an important day.”Some members of the Class of 2017, however, did not appreciate graduates walking out of the ceremony. Jacob Hoyt, who graduated with a degree in chemical engineering, said he felt the walkout was disruptive.“I didn’t like it that much,” he said. “I thought it was — it just kind of disturbed the whole process, and I don’t know how much of a statement it really made. My family kind of didn’t like it either, because it just interrupted the whole flow of things and just seemed a little excessive.”Other students, such as Mendoza College of Business graduate Rebekah Rumschlag, did not feel strongly about the demonstration one way or another.“I think that a silent walkout — if you’re going to do some type of protest — is a very respectful protest to do,” Rumschlag said. “In general, I think, though, that not staying to listen to what a speaker has to say limits conversation between two opposing ideas. I guess it’s different when someone is giving a speech because there’s not going to be a dialogue because they’re just talking at you, so I feel fairly indifferent about it. … I understand why students would walk out.”Others supported the walkout, but chose not to participate and remain with their classmates throughout the rest of the Commencement ceremony. Julia Le, who graduated with a degree in science business, said she wanted to keep the focus on the graduates.“I was all for [the walkout],” she said. “ … I wanted to stay for my parents, but then also I think I could show my support and solidarity with those groups in different ways, and so today was more about me and my fellow students, and I didn’t want it to become a thing where we have to leave our own graduation because of our difference in opinions with our Commencement speaker.”The act of walking out of Commencement, Patrick Crane said, took away from the occasion for other students who disagreed with the protestors.“They placed themselves over the rest of their classmates, which is despicable,” he said. “ … Instead of sharing that moment and sharing that excitement, sharing that last alma mater together, they decided to be selfish and take away from a ceremony that should have brought us all together.”Favorite recognized that he and other protestors may have missed out on valuable aspects of their graduation, but he said he felt he would have sacrificed something with either choice.“There were moments where I started questioning whether I would be missing out on something by leaving,” Favorite said. “And I’m sure I did. I’m sure there’s an aspect of the community that I would’ve gotten had I stayed throughout the ceremony. But at the same time, I think you would’ve gained and lost something by staying, as well.”Recalling the students who protested when then-President Barack Obama served as the 2009 Commencement speaker, however, Crane said he was disappointed with the students who chose to participate in the walkout, as he had been with those who chose not to attend Obama’s speech.“I, personally, would never do something like that,” he said. “I think it’s a cowardly act to run away from a problem instead of hearing the other side out and finding a solution towards it. … In 2009, when then-President Obama came to campus, there were students who decided they didn’t want to hear something from the President, which itself, I believe, is both anti-American — to not hear what the leader of your country has to say — but also, again, cowardly in not wanting to broaden your own horizons and sharpen your razor with their rhetoric.”last_img read more

Broadway Balances America Introduces You to The Bodyguard’s Deborah Cox

first_img View Comments Anything you want done, baby! Broadway Balances America, the special six-part series airing on The Balancing Act on Lifetime Television, continued its third season on November 21 with a special look at the new musical The Bodyguard, based on the smash hit film. Correspondent Amber Milt chats with the show’s Grammy-nominated star Deborah Cox, who’s leading the American premiere and national tour of the show, at the iconic Fontainebleau on Miami Beach. Click play! Broadway Balances Americacenter_img Deborah Coxlast_img read more

Goodrich delivers 2,000th helicopter management system

first_imgCollins Aerospace,Goodrich Delivers 2,000th Helicopter Health and Usage Management System (HUMS)Diagnostic health management system saves time, money for military, commercial helicoptersGoodrich Corporation s (NYSE:GR) Sensors and Integrated Systems business in Vergennes, Vt. marked the delivery of its 2,000th helicopter health and usage management system (HUMS) in a ceremony March 8, 2010 attended by employees and U.S. Senator Patrick Leahy (D-VT). Leahy has supported the company in winning more than $100 million in contracts to develop and deploy the HUMS systems for a number of helicopter platforms for the U.S. Army and Marine Corps. I am incredibly proud to mark this day with the men and women of Goodrich, said Leahy. 2,000 HUMS units are a win for Vermont, the Department of Defense, and our men and women in uniform. These life-saving, money-saving devices keep our helicopters flying safely and have been at the heart of this region s economy.Goodrich Sensors and Integrated Systems vice president Gary Loftus described how a U.S. Army Black Hawk helicopter unit, fully equipped with HUMS, recently set a new record for numbers of hours flown in a 12-month period and saved taxpayers $45 million in maintenance costs. The HUMS units give feedback to mechanics that enable them to catch big problems while they are still small, inexpensive problems, Loftus explained. They also catch problems while the helicopter is either on the ground or in time to get the helicopter to the ground safely. Our employees are proud of the role they play in helping our warfighters save lives, time and money.Goodrich s Health and Usage Management Systems (HUMS) give mechanics feedback on a helicopter s engine performance, structural performance and rotor performance allowing a helicopter to be serviced before major system failures. Before the use of HUMS units, helicopters were routinely taken out of service for unnecessary preventative maintenance. The units are onboard a variety of military and commercial helicopters including the U.S. Army s UH-60 Black Hawk and CH-47 Chinook, the U.S. Marine Corps CH-53E Super Stallion, and Sikorsky s commercial S-76D® and S-92 aircraft.Goodrich Corporation, a Fortune 500 company, is a global supplier of systems and services to aerospace, defense and homeland security markets. With one of the most strategically diversified portfolios of products in the industry, Goodrich serves a global customer base with significant worldwide manufacturing and service facilities. For more information, visithttp://www.goodrich.com/(link is external).Goodrich Corporation operates through its divisions and as a parent company for its subsidiaries, one or more of which may be referred to as Goodrich Corporation in this press release.GR Electronic SystemsSource: Goodrich Corporation. CHARLOTTE, N.C., March 11, 2010 /PRNewswire-FirstCall/last_img read more