4 Ways to Make Extra Money by Using Social Media

first_img Please enter your comment! Please enter your name here Need extra spending money?  There are ways to make money just by using social media and some of these things you might already be doing but just didn’t know there was a way to get paid. We found four ways to make money by using social media from the Krazy Coupon Lady website. 1.Sign up with Co-Sign and Earn a 35% commission  CoSign gives you the ability to earn money by ‘tagging’ your items. When anyone purchases an item through your tag, you can make up to 35% in commission.Like I said, you don’t need a large social media following to make money, but the more people in your network, the more money you’ll make. CoSign works with Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, Pinterest, and Tumblr. The cash-out minimum is $40 via PayPal, check, or gift card to a particular retailer.2.Tweet to Earn $1 or $75 on Instagram IZEA connects you with big brands like Dole, Cliff, Hallmark, etc. by giving you opportunities to bid on work with your favorite brands. Opportunities range from writing sponsored content if you have a blog to posting sponsored tweets or branded Facebook and Instagram posts. Not only can you bid, but advertisers can also reach out directly to you with opportunities.With a free account, you can place three bids per month and cash out when you reach $100. Or, pay $1 per month for unlimited bids and a $50 cash-out threshold per month. You’ll cash out through PayPal.3.Share Magnet Pays You on Sharing Links When you create an account with Share Magnet, you’ll gain access to links you can share on your social media accounts. These links come from business owners who want to spread awareness about their product or service. For example, maybe you’d share a link to a hair care product for people who want to grow thicker hair.Best part? You don’t need a large following on social media! Share Magnet works with Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest. Once you meet the minimum, cash out via PayPal.4.Earn $50 to Write Content for MyLikes Sign up for MyLikes, and then you can create your own ‘Social Website’ where you can share advertisers’ links with your followers and create your own content.Choose your own domain name, customize the theme on your page, and then you’ll see the links you can share to earn revenue. You’ll also be able to see data showing how your links do when you share them. This way, you can track engagement to help you earn even more!You’ll earn on a per-click basis depending on the traffic you bring to your website from the links you share. Cash out once per week via PayPal when you hit the $20 minimum. Or, you can opt for direct deposit once you hit the $50 minimum. Save my name, email, and website in this browser for the next time I comment. Gov. DeSantis says new moment-of-silence law in public schools protects religious freedom UF/IFAS in Apopka will temporarily house District staff; saves almost $400,000 LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replycenter_img Share on Facebook Tweet on Twitter TAGSDonna’s DealsSocial Media Previous articleThe First 100 Days – Part Five: How Mayor Nelson will start his first termNext article5 Easy Easter Egg Decoration Ideas For the Whole Family Denise Connell RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Florida gas prices jump 12 cents; most expensive since 2014 Donna’s Deals You have entered an incorrect email address! Please enter your email address herelast_img read more

Neville backs player quota system

first_imgA quota system should be introduced to the Premier League to help the home nations, according to England coach Gary Neville, who fears the top flight has passed its “tipping point” when it comes to foreign players. The former Manchester United full-back, who combines his role as a television pundit with assisting England boss Roy Hodgson, is concerned about the direction the British and Irish national sides are heading in. And citing the start of his own career as an example when clubs were limited to the amount of overseas players they could field, Neville has suggested an inversion of that system whereby managers would have to pick players from the home nations. Speaking to the Guardian, Neville said: “Last week I looked at a list of players signed into the Premier League. I like to think I’m well-read on football but, honestly, I’d never heard of 50-60 per cent of them. “All right, we might unearth lots of talent from abroad. And some fantastic foreign players and managers have enhanced British football no end. But I used the phrase ‘tipping point’ last season and I feel we’re going too far right now. “We need to protect our English, Scottish, Welsh, Northern Irish and Irish national teams by giving more boys from those countries more opportunities. “England not winning trophies, or even reaching the semi-finals of major competitions any longer, is a problem for us. “It’s also a problem for the Premier League, which seems behind the German and Spanish leagues. “The way I see it, British football clubs and managers, the Football Association and the Premier League need to come together as one. We all want a successful group of home nations which produce more domestic players. “It’s not just England. Look what’s happened to Scottish football. Look at the Republic of Ireland. Roy Keane, Niall Quinn, Steve Staunton, Paul McGrath and Kevin Moran always played on English soil and in the Premier League. “We need to come together and get back to a point where there is a quota system of some kind. I know people say you can’t implement this because of European law but where there’s a will there’s a way.” Neville made his name at Old Trafford as part of a side heavily made up of young talent. The 38-year-old grew up and played with the likes of David Beckham, Nicky Butt, Ryan Giggs, Paul Scholes and brother Phil, but feels that had he been trying to make a breakthrough in this era, he may have struggled. “When I came through in the mid-1990s there was a rule where only a limited number of foreign players could be included in a team during European competition,” he added. “We benefited from that because, as young British players, we got opportunities. We need to get back something of that ilk – where each team has three or four players from the home countries at the start of every match. “My chances of making it as a pro footballer at the age of 18 in 2013 would be a lot less than 20 years ago. A talented 18-year-old today has to hope he’s at the right club with the right manager who believes in young players. But it’s become so short-term. “The average manager has no time to think about the youth team – let alone create a structure and philosophy at the club. It’s a vicious circle and one that disappoints me about the modern game. I’m a traditionalist and think people should be given time.” Press Associationlast_img read more