Umphrey’s Busts Out The Clash At Chucktown Ball Closer, Announces Three-Night Run In Atlanta

first_imgUmphrey’s McGee returned to Charleston, SC last night, for the second night of their own Chucktown Ball. The southern city event started as a series of benefit concerts in Charleston last year, after a hometown mass shooting stirred band members who live in the city. This year, the band took the Ball to the next level, bringing on special guest musicians in a larger venue, the North Charleston Coliseum & Performing Arts Center. You can listen to Friday night’s performance here.Saturday night’s concert-goers were treated to an extreme evening of music, with electronic duo The Floozies kicking things off as the night’s support. When UM took the stage, fans were treated to an all-original set of music, including an extensive “Miami Virtue” into “Mad Love” jam. The first set closed with a fan-favorited “2×2” rocker, which featured teases of Eye of the Tiger’s “Survivor”, Pink Floyd‘s “Another Brick in the Wall”, and John Coltrane‘s “A Love Supreme”.The second set opened with a stand-out version of “Life During Exodus”, a mashing of Talking Heads’ “Life During Wartime” and Bob Marley’s “Exodus,” with Frank Zappa’s “City of Tiny Lites” and Chicago’s “25 or 6 to 4.” The mashup is featured on their upcoming album, ZONKEY, which comes out this Fall. Sticking to the tease-heavy theme of Saturday night’s setlist, the band’s performance of “Bad Friday” included teases of Michael Jackson‘s “Billie Jean.”Toward the end of the set, the Chicago-based jam greats busted out “Rock The Casbah” for the 11th time in their nearly twenty year career. The Clash cover has not been performed by the sextet since September of 2015 at the Forest Park in St. Louis, MO. The Casbah classic led into a “Drums” jam, and then into the “Hurt Bird Bath” set closer, which incorporated teases of Bach‘s “Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring”, before Umphrey’s McGee returned to the stage for a “Puppet String” encore.Come November 11th, Umphrey’s McGee will release ZONKEY, a new studio album that features recordings of the band’s famed mash up tracks. Having already released versions of “Life During Exodus” and “National Loser Anthem”, which features a mash-up of Radiohead, Beck, and Phil Collins, last night’s performance was pure indication that this release will be full of surprises.Following last night’s show, keyboardist Joel Cummins announced from the stage that the band will return to Atlanta, GA for a three-night stand at The Tabernacle over Martin Luther King weekend in January. He confirmed this statement with a tweet earlier today: Umphrey’s McGee @ Chuck Town Ball, North Charleston Coliseum North Charleston, SC 9/24/16:Set I: October Rain > Speak Up, Miami Virtue > Mad Love, Higgins, Preamble > Mantis, 2×2*Set II: Life During Exodus^, All In Time > Prowler > All In Time, Bad Friday^^, Rock the Casbah > Drums > Hurt Bird Bath^^^Enc: Puppet StringNotes: *with Eye of the Tiger (Survivor) jam and Another Brick in the Wall (Pink Floyd) and A Love Supreme (John Coltrane) teases^with 25 or 6 to 4 (Chicago) tease^^with Billie Jean (Michael Jackson) tease^^^With Jesu, Joy of Man’s Desiring (Bach) tease[Setlist via AllThingsUmphreys]last_img read more

NTSB : LIRR Train in Brooklyn Crash Traveled Double the Speed Limit

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York The Long Island Rail Road train that partially derailed Wednesday morning in Brooklyn, injuring more than 100 people, was traveling at a higher rate of speed than is permitted before it crashed, federal investigators said.The LIRR train pulled into Atlantic Terminal exceeding 10 mph, as opposed to the 5 mph speed limit, a National Transportation Safety Board spokesman, Peter Knudson, said. Additionally, the train’s engineer, who has since been interviewed by investigators, said he only remembers directing the train as it approached Atlantic Terminal but nothing after. Investigators described him as “very cooperative,” Knudson said. The 50-year-old engineer is an MTA veteran of more than 15 years. He started his career with the agency in 1999 and became an engineer in 2000. The engineer, who the NTSB did not identify, spent the majority of his career working the overnight shift. He began his shift Wednesday “some time after midnight,” Knudson said. Investigators have not determined a cause of the crash, and the incident is still being scrutinized.Luckily, no one was killed.The six-car train, which originated from Far Rockaway and was carrying 430 passengers, was pulling into Atlantic Terminal at approximately 9:15 a.m. Wednesday. While entering the station, the engineer reduced the train’s speed to 15 mph and was traveling more than 10 mph at the time of impact. As a result, the train slammed into a bumper designed to prevent trains from traveling passed a certain point, causing the lead car and at least one axle to derail. The bumper block is able to withstand “low-speed impact” of just several miles per hour, investigators have determined. As the investigation continues, NTSB will endeavor to reach out to passengers for preliminary interviews. Meanwhile, the NTSB’s mechanics have concluded an exam of the train’s exterior, which allowed the MTA to begin removing the damaged train from the terminals. As of Thursday, four of its six cars had been removed. Officials said 103 passengers suffered mostly minor injuries.Embed from Getty Images Gov. Andrew Cuomo, who was at the scene shortly after the crash, said it was difficult to account for all the injured because many passengers did not wait around to seek medical attention.Cuomo said the investigation would focus on why the train failed to come to a complete stop as it entered the terminal.Additionally, officials said the train’s engineer, conductor and brakeman would all be interviewed.This was the second serious crash involving a LIRR train in nearly three months. In October, an eastbound LIRR train collided with a work train, injuring 29 people. No one was killed in that incident, either.last_img read more

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