Consumers more wary about the food they eat

first_imgA large number of consumers have trust issues when it comes to food, the latest report from Mintel has revealed.In its Consumer Trust in Food 2013 study, it found that six months on from the horsemeat scandal, British consumers were still pretty sceptical about the efficiency of the British food industry.Only just under half (49%) said they trusted the food industry to provide safe food to eat, while 37% were undecided.Forty-two per cent of Brits believe the food industry is able to effectively react to food scares such as BSE and horsemeat, and only 23% feel that the different elements of the supply chain work effectively together.According to Mintel, the concerns regarding the trustworthiness of food were strongly related to fact they felt the industry had a lack of awareness of its own supply chains, with 34% stating they felt food manufacturers weren’t aware of where their ingredients originated from.Alex Beckett, senior food analyst at Mintel, said the food industry had a big job on its hands to regain consumer trust.“That food should not be harmful should be one of the most basic of consumer expectations, yet only half of adults feel the UK food industry provides food that is safe to eat, signalling a widespread breakdown of trust in the agri-food chain, and suggesting the need for more active communications and greater transparency towards consumers.”He added that grocers and manufacturers have typically not drawn attention to suppliers of own-brand products, “but providing these details on-pack could help to support consumer trust in the grocers’ sourcing”.The report also revealed that the top five factors which would encourage consumer trust in food were: British ingredients; manufacturing details on food labelling (where and when made); animal welfare certificate; product origin on the pack; and no artificial ingredients.last_img read more

Inside Rising Appalachia’s Socially Conscious Approach To Live Music

first_imgSisters Chloe Smith and Leah Song, along with percussionist Biko Casini and bassist/guitarist David Brown, have created a grassroots musical revolution with their band Rising Appalachia. The band’s folk-driven melodies are backed by a dedication to affecting positive change, using their nationwide touring to work with local communities across the country. It was Leah who coined the term “Slow Music Movement,” the campaign by which Rising Appalachia is able to give back and inspire real social change.We had the opportunity to check in with the band as they continue their battle against the wastefulness of touring, hitting like-minded festivals including the upcoming Symbiosis Gathering, which runs from September 22-25 (more info here). As Symbiosis co-owner Kevin KoChen explains, “we are participants in a movement that skews away from products and services owned by multi-national corporations. It’s common sense and a central tenet of permaculture, ‘earth care, people care, and fair share’.” Read on to learn all about the Movement, and everything going on with Rising Appalachia!L4LM: How were you inspired to create the “Slow Music Movement”? Was there a particular moment, or was it something that grew after spending years on the road?Leah: The Slow Music Movement was a term that I coined while I was prepping for a Ted X talk a little while ago. I wanted to discuss our ways of touring and moving through 12 years of music. Alternative touring has always been a priority of our music project. We tour independently and creatively, have remained self-managed, and have ALWAYS had a relationship with local communities on the ground as often as we can, but when we gave a voice and a title to that intention it became much more powerful. Hence the Slow Music Movement.The Slow Music Movement is an effort to bring in local outreach to each event, reduce single-use waste at shows, source farm-to-table food for backstage, and continue to create and promote sustainable touring practices within the music industry. It’s our effort to take the glitz and glam out of the music industry and bring performance back to its roots – that of public service- where musicians are not just part of a fast-paced entertainment world, but instead influence the cultural shift of communities as troubadours, activists, story tellers, and catalysts of justice.L4LM: Do you see this as the natural progression from your recent tour via train?Leah: Sustainable and alternative travel has been a part of our greater mission from the get go of Rising Appalachia… How can we create a music that reaches beyond the stereotypical bar and club scene and create a way to make music a social service and a public affair… Rail travel was such a natural extension of our investigations in alternative transit… Can rail travel in the US be a sustainable option, and can we use a resource that already exists to launch into a more reliable and publicly available mass transit option? That’s what the train tour was all about. David, our guitarist, got deeply invested in the research and leg work to actually make the tour possible.David: We have toured in other parts of the world via rail and have loved it immensely. We didn’t really know that train travel in the states was a real option until I read a Harper’s article about passenger trains a couple years ago (ironically, while on layover in an airport). Trains appeal to us because we want to ‘walk our talk’ – we have messages about “scaling down” in our music, encouraging folks to drive less, build local relationships, etc, and we want to keep it real as we become a better known and sought after band. The amount of driving and flying that most bands do is really unappealing to us, so its cool to find a means of travel that suits our values more. Pursuing a train based tour really seemed like a powerful step for us towards the kind of world we want to be living in.Biko: Our intentions in undergoing the rail tour was to see for ourselves what rail touring was like. Is it a feasible method of transportation? What does it feel like? This nation was originally built by rail, but most people alive today do not remember traveling the nation by train. If the young people of today are going to be inspired to ride trains, it will be because it seems like trains are a step forward… not because they are looking nostalgically backwards. The challenge facing the passenger rail industry today is to capture peoples imagination by how green rail travel is, and the implications it will have on our experience of travel in the future. We aim to inspire people with what rail travel is, and what it can be.L4LM: Tell us about some of the logistics behind the Slow Music Movement. What work is being done on the ground, and how does it happen?Leah: We work in strong partnership with a multitude of activist organizations…We have continued involvement in important campaigns along our touring routes, such as the “Love Water Not Oil” campaign with Winona LaDuke and the Ojibwe tribe last year working to educate the nation on pipeline proposals at the headwaters of the Mississippi river. We have worked for years with the School of Americas Vigil which is working to close down a federally funded para-military institute in Columbus, GA, tied to human rights abuses around the world. We have toured and worked in partnership with Mountain Justice initiates (putting an end to mountain top removal), dam removals, restorative justice work, and international arts education…among many other things. The lists are lengthy and we each have our own personal politics, but I think the main crossroads for us is using music as a tool and a catalyst for betterment in our communities, and as a platform for dialog around justice issues in our world. That means that the music is always available to be a resource for social change.And yes, we do see progress…in that Slow Movement kind of way. We see progress on a one-on-one basis, when a mountain is saved, or a new song learned, or a return to a landscape is written about. We see progress when someone comes up after a show and says “I want to use my voice for things I believe in” or “thank you because I haven’t danced like that for a long time because I was sick, and its powerful to feel my body move again” or “I decided to quit my job and go into at-risk-youth counseling and I thank you for the courage to make a difference”… or any of the myriads of things that we learn from our powerful fans about how they are each touched to make changes in their own lives. We all need that momentum from each other to live in a fully integrated way. That is the most valuable kind of progress.L4LM: What is the best way for someone to get involved with the Movement?Chloe: Reach out to us if we are coming to your town and lets get the conversation going early about what is happening locally. What initiatives are being pushed. What environmental or social justice movements need to be voiced or gathered around. If you are a local nonprofit or organizer, we want to hear from you ! We are also always looking to source local fresh farm food and apothecaries around our concerts in order to sustain our own health and wellness on the road, so send suggestions ! Rising Appalachia is invested in creating a larger network around our music that helps this massive burst of energy we create with music stay grounded and in service to things much larger than ourselves… which means all hands on deck.L4LM: How do you want to see the Slow Music Movement project grow from here?Leah: We hope for the Slow Music Movement to become a platform that will grow around our intentions to continue pushing music into many realms of grassroots organizing and old school public service, and will also provide a blue print for other artists to utilize for alternative music industry options. Alternative transportation options like trains, boats, horses, bicycles. Food that is sourced locally and grown with care and intention. A platform to share ideas and give voice to the many interwoven global concerns of justice and protection of all things wild. We hope that it will grow much bigger than us.L4LM: Musically speaking, what is your next step for RA after the success of ‘Wider Circles’? Is anything in the works?Leah: We are very content to still be playing the music in our collection, and it is still very fresh and inspiring to pull onto the stage. We are slowly cooking up new ideas with influence from trip-hop, hip-hop, and transformational funk.Currently, Arouna Diarra, an amazing folk musician from Burkina Faso, has been performing more and more frequently with us. He is one of the teachers of Biko who met him in Africa and studied with him here in the states. Diarra is amazing holder and curator of music and we look forward to artistically collaborating more and more with him. He’ll be with us at Symbiosis!Chloe: Collaboration will be key in the coming years. There is talk of remix collaborations in the future as well as EP’s with some favorite folk artist friends. Right now it is less about producing more Rising Appalachia albums and more about opening up our artistic circles and seeing what we can co-create with other artists. Wider Circles is indeed a potent album for the times still and we are loving diving into the depths of its sound and finding the hidden gems inside.last_img read more

Slow Man Comfortable Sneakers Feel Like You’re Walking on Clouds

first_img– Advertisement – Us Weekly has affiliate partnerships so we may receive compensation for some links to products and services.Confession: We just hit the sneaker jackpot! We’ve already found plenty of winners out there (and our shoe racks are practically overflowing as a result), but this pair may be one of the best options yet. If you suffer from foot pain, pay close attention — this one’s for you.- Advertisement – These sneakers from Slow Man are truly outstanding. They have a thick sole in the heel area which provides incredible arch support, and they also come equipped with a sock built in — immediately upping their comfort level!Slow Man Women's Walking Shoes Sock SneakersSlow Man Women’s Walking Shoes Sock Sneakers AmazonSee it!Get the Slow Man Women’s Walking Shoes Sock Sneakers for prices starting at just $24, available at Amazon! Please note, prices are accurate at the date of publication, November 2, 2020, but are subject to change.- Advertisement – See it!Get the Slow Man Women’s Walking Shoes Sock Sneakers for prices starting at just $24, available at Amazon! Please note, prices are accurate at the date of publication, November 2, 2020, but are subject to change.The built-in sock are one of our favorite qualities of these sneakers. The styles vary, but some feature a durable mesh material and a higher sock line, while others have a sportier look. Each of the sneakers is available in a slip-on style with adjustable laces that aren’t fussy or difficult to use.These sneakers could become your new go-to pair of shoes for casual, low-key days. If you aren’t doing a high-intensity activity, they can even become a workout essential. They aren’t intended for running, but you can definitely wear them out for walks or bike rides. They’re a sneaker you can count on, and that’s exactly why we’re so ready to scoop them up!See it: Get the Slow Man Women’s Walking Shoes Sock Sneakers for prices starting at just $24, available at Amazon! Please note, prices are accurate at the date of publication, November 2, 2020, but are subject to change.Not what you’re looking for? Check out more styles from Slow Man and shop all of the clothing, shoes and jewelry available at Amazon! Don’t forget to check out all of Amazon’s Daily Deals here!Check out more of our picks and deals here!This post is brought to you by Us Weekly’s Shop With Us team. The Shop With Us team aims to highlight products and services our readers might find interesting and useful, such as face masks, self tanners, Lululemon-style leggings and all the best gifts for everyone in your life. Product and service selection, however, is in no way intended to constitute an endorsement by either Us Weekly or of any celebrity mentioned in the post.The Shop With Us team may receive products free of charge from manufacturers to test. In addition, Us Weekly receives compensation from the manufacturer of the products we write about when you click on a link and then purchase the product featured in an article. This does not drive our decision as to whether or not a product or service is featured or recommended. Shop With Us operates independently from advertising sales team. We welcome your feedback at [email protected] Happy shopping! These sneakers are a serious favorite of Amazon shoppers around the globe. They currently have over 40,000 reviews, including countless five-star ratings — which certainly piqued our interest during a browsing session. Those who have already picked up a pair of these sneakers claim they’re super lightweight and ideal for all-day wear. Thanks to their sleek, supportive design, one shopper even compared them to walking on clouds. Dreams come true!Reviewers are comparing these sneakers to popular, expensive pairs that run upwards of $150 — but these are so affordable. Between the price tag and positive feedback, this may be the deal of the season!Slow Man Women's Walking Shoes Sock SneakersAmazonSlow Man Women’s Walking Shoes Sock Sneakers- Advertisement –last_img read more

ACC to relocate neutral site championships from North Carolina, keep campus site events

first_img Comments Facebook Twitter Google+ Related Stories NCAA to relocate championships from North Carolina in 2016-17 because of House Bill 2 The Atlantic Coast Conference is relocating all eight of its neutral site championships that were going to be held in North Carolina in 2016-17, including the football championship game, the conference announced Wednesday. It will keep all the championship events held on ACC campuses, though.The new locations will be announced at a later date.“As members of the Atlantic Coast Conference, the ACC Council of Presidents reaffirmed our collective commitment to uphold the values of equality, diversity, inclusion and non-discrimination,” the conference council of presidents said in a statement. “Every one of our 15 universities is strongly committed to these values and therefore, we will continue to host ACC Championships at campus sites. We believe North Carolina House Bill 2 is inconsistent with these values.”The move comes two days after the NCAA announced it will relocate its seven championship events from North Carolina because of House Bill 2, which most notably forces everyone to use the bathroom of the sex listed on their birth certificate and prevents transgender people from using the bathrooms of their associated gender.“Today’s decision is one of principle, and while this decision is the right one, we recognize there will be individuals and communities that are supportive of our values as well as our championship sites that will be negatively affected,” ACC commissioner John Swofford said. “Hopefully, there will be opportunities beyond 2016-17 for North Carolina neutral sites to be awarded championships.”AdvertisementThis is placeholder textSyracuse University’s chancellor Kent Syverud and director of athletics John Wildhack both expressed their support of the conference’s decision in statements.“Syracuse University is committed to the core values of diversity, inclusion and respect,” Syverud said. “The University studied this issue and supports the decision of the ACC.”“Diversity and inclusion are hallmarks at Syracuse University and within Syracuse Athletics,” Wildhack said. “We support the decision by the ACC presidents.”Below is the list of ACC championships that will be moved:Women’s SoccerFootballMen’s and Women’s Swimming and DivingWomen’s BasketballMen’s and Women’s TennisWomen’s GolfMen’s GolfBaseball Published on September 14, 2016 at 1:34 pm Contact Jon: [email protected] | @jmettuslast_img read more