Little Feat Announce Full Band Performances For Northeast Run

first_imgRock and roll staples Little Feat are gearing up for some fun times ahead, as the group has just announced a handful of shows in the Northeast. While members Fred Tackett and Paul Barrere occasionally perform as a duo, this will mark the full band’s first shows in some time, and we couldn’t be more excited.Unfortunately, however, the run doesn’t kick off until September, so there’s plenty of time to build anticipation before the magic. The four-night run will see the band hit shows in Boston, Port Chester, Huntington, and Washington DC, bringing all of their classics to stage for an exciting round of performances.Check out the full schedule below, and head to the band’s website for details. Pre-sale for tickets begins tomorrow at 10 AM, and full on sale for tickets will happen this Friday, March 25th, at 10 AM.Little Feat Tour Dates9/8/16 – Boston, MA – Wilbur Theatre9/9/16 – Port Chester, NY – The Capitol Theatre9/10/16 – Huntington, NY – The Paramount9/12/16 – Washington, DC – Warner TheatrePresales are Wednesday at 10am > Thursday at 10pm.On sale to public Friday at 10am.[Photo via Little Feat FB]last_img read more

Baby killer verdict: Manslaughter ‘doesn’t do justice’ says Bob McCoskrie

first_imgNZ Herald 22 July 2016Family First Comment: Children deserve the fullest protection of the strongest law we can give them. When adults thrash, bash and shake little children, they should not be able to hide behind the lesser manslaughter charge. It’s murder.Anyone inflicting violence against children should be charged with murder, rather than manslaughter, a family safety advocate says.Tawera Wesley Wichman, 24, was sentenced at the Wellington High Court today to three years and 10 months in prison for shaking his 11-month-old daughter Teegan Tairoa-Wichman to death in 2009.Family First national director Bob McCoskrie said this was a tragic case which involved a vulnerable family.“He [Wichman] was young and it seemed like there was support to start with and it dissipated over time.“The support lessened over time but it was pretty evident the family weren’t out of the woods yet,” he said.He thought a manslaughter charge shouldn’t apply when extreme violence was inflicted on babies and toddlers.“Children are vulnerable. To argue that injury or death was not intentional, so therefore murder can’t be applied … it doesn’t do justice.”McCoskrie said in this case, the parents were told of the dangers of shaking a baby.“They knew they couldn’t shake a baby.“When dealing with children and babies, you should be able to foresee shaking or treating a baby or toddler roughly or with violence could result in injury or death,” he said.He said it was clear Child Youth and Family (CYF) had high concerns for the twins when they were discharged from the special-care baby unit.“To me, this shows the whole issue of when the red flags are raised and when it is clear these are the ones we need to put time and resources into.”He said it didn’t matter whether the act of violence was just one-off or over a long period of time.READ MORE: http://www.nzherald.co.nz/nz/news/article.cfm?c_id=1&objectid=11678945last_img read more