BUSINESS BRIEF Anantha Chandrakasan To Join Analog Devices Board of Directors

first_img(NOTE: Analog Devices, headquartered in Norwood, has a location in Wilmington at 804 Woburn Street.)WILMINGTON, MA — Analog Devices, Inc., a global leader in high-performance semiconductors for signal processing applications, today announced that its Board of Directors has appointed Anantha Chandrakasan as an independent director on the Board, effective January 1, 2019. Dr. Chandrakasan is dean of MIT’s School of Engineering and the Vannevar Bush Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. In addition, Dr. Chandrakasan co-chairs the MIT–IBM Watson AI Lab and chairs the MIT-SenseTime Alliance on Artificial Intelligence and J-Clinic, the Abdul Latif Jameel Clinic for Machine Learning in Health at MIT.“We are honored to welcome Anantha to the ADI Board. His impressive work at MIT and expertise in technologies that are shaping the future of information and communication, business, and indeed, society will be of great value to ADI,” said Ray Stata, ADI Chairman of the Board. “We look forward to his contributions to the Company.”Dr. Chandrakasan joined the MIT faculty in 1994 and was director of the Microsystems Technology Laboratories (MTL) from 2006 until he became the head of the Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science in 2011, a position that concluded with his appointment as dean in July 2017. He is an IEEE fellow, and in 2015 he was elected to the National Academy of Engineering. In addition, he has received many prestigious awards including the 2009 Semiconductor Industry Association (SIA) University Researcher Award, the 2013 IEEE Donald O. Pederson Award in Solid-State Circuits, an honorary doctorate from KU Leuven in 2016, and the UC Berkeley EE Distinguished Alumni Award.Dr. Chandrakasan earned his bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral degrees in Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences from the University of California, Berkeley.About Analog DevicesAnalog Devices (Nasdaq: ADI) is a leading global high-performance analog technology company dedicated to solving the toughest engineering challenges. We enable our customers to interpret the world around us by intelligently bridging the physical and digital with unmatched technologies that sense, measure, power, connect and interpret.(NOTE: The above press release is from Analog Devices.)Like Wilmington Apple on Facebook. Follow Wilmington Apple on Twitter. Follow Wilmington Apple on Instagram. Subscribe to Wilmington Apple’s daily email newsletter HERE. Got a comment, question, photo, press release, or news tip? Email wilmingtonapple@gmail.com.Thank You To Our Sponsor:Share this:TwitterFacebookLike this:Like Loading… RelatedBUSINESS BRIEF: Analog Devices Recognized For Employee Benefits, Work Culture & Business GrowthIn “Business”BUSINESS BRIEF: Wilmington’s Analog Devices Welcomes Karen Golz To Board of DirectorsIn “Business”SELECTMEN NEWS: Analog Devices Updates Town On $157 Million Campus ExpansionIn “Government”last_img read more

On Third Anniversary Of Josué Flores Murder Houston Police Ask Public To

first_imgAlvaro ‘Al’ Ortiz/Houston Public MediaA banner shows solidarity with Josué Flores’ family after the 11-year-old boy’s murder in Houston, in May 2016.May 17 marks the third anniversary of the murder of 11-year-old Josué Flores in Houston’s Near Northside and investigators are asking for help from the public. Houston Police Chief Art Acevedo said new evidence is being analyzed at a Utah lab that specializes in DNA testing.Flores’ murder shocked Houston and especially the Near Northside neighborhood because of its brutality. The killer stabbed him multiple times at the 1900 block of Fulton Street when the boy was returning to his home after leaving Marshall Middle School.“We have evidence now in Utah at a lab that is utilizing techniques to extract DNA from evidence that our lab and our state lab does not the capacity to do,” said Acevedo on Friday during a media availability that Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner and Flores’ mother also attended.The evidence is from a piece of clothing and HPD’s cold case squad is also investigating the case.Acevedo said that Andre Jackson, the homeless veteran who was charged with Flores’ murder and released in July 2017 because Harris County District Attorney Kim Ogg dropped the charges, is still a person of interest for the investigators.The DA’s office said the results of DNA and blood analyses were inconclusive.Acevedo played a short video that was recorded by a surveillance camera the day of the murder near the place where it happened. The video shows an African-American man walking and wearing a distinctive jacket. Investigators are asking the public to help identify the man. According to police, he could be Jackson.HPD detectives are also asking potential witnesses of the crime who spoke to local media anonymously to come forward and help with the investigation.After the murder, Near Northside resident Stella Mireles-Walters started the Safe Walk Home program. It has trained neighbors to be vigilant, particularly when children go to school in the morning and when they leave, and alert HPD and other law enforcement agencies if they see somebody or something suspicious.Investigators and residents also thought that Flores’ murderer could have stayed at a homeless shelter the Salvation Army managed in the neighborhood. The organization closed the shelter in November.You can watch the video HPD showed and Chief Acevedo’s media availabilty here:PERSON OF INTEREST: Our homicide investigators want to speak to this man regarding the murder of Josue Flores, 11, in the 1900 block of Fulton on May 17, 2016. If you have info, call HPD Homicide 713-308-3600 or @CrimeStopHOU 713-222-TIPS. You could receive up to $5,000 reward. pic.twitter.com/B1lwgqC1d7— Houston Police (@houstonpolice) May 17, 2019 Sharelast_img read more

Protests Held in Pittsburgh After Cop Cleared in Shooting

first_imgBy Mark Scolforo, The Associated PressThe father of a slain Black teenager pleaded for peace March 23 after the acquittal of a White police officer triggered an apparent retaliatory shooting at the defense attorney’s office and touched off protests in the streets of Pittsburgh.Police put officers on 12-hour shifts until further notice.The verdict late March 22 in the deadly shooting of 17-year-old Antwon Rose II angered his family and civic leaders and prompted hundreds of people to gather Saturday afternoon at an intersection called Freedom Corner in the Hill District neighborhood, the historic center of black cultural life in Pittsburgh. One man held a sign with the names of Black men killed by police around the U.S.Marchers move through the streets Saturday, March 23, 2019 in Pittsburgh, Pa. The group was calling for justice the day after former East Pittsburgh police officer Michael Rosfeld was acquitted in the homicide trial where he was charged with shooting and killing 17-year-old Antwon Rose II last summer near Pittsburgh. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)“It’s very painful to see what happened, to sit there and deal with it,” Rose’s father, Antwon Rose Sr., told the crowd. “I just don’t want it to happen to our city no more.”Afterward, he told reporters: “I want peace, period, all the way around. … Just because there was violence doesn’t mean that we counter that with violence.”The mostly white crowd then marched through downtown Pittsburgh and other city neighborhoods, periodically blocking streets as they chanted, “Who did this? Police did this!” The protest soon moved onto the University of Pittsburgh campus. Police reported no immediate arrests or injuries.Early March 23, five to eight shots were fired into the building where the officer’s attorney, Patrick Thomassey, works, police in nearby Monroeville said. No one was hurt. Police said they had been staking out the place as a precaution, and the gunfire erupted after they left to answer another call around midnight.Former East Pittsburgh police Officer Michael Rosfeld had been charged with homicide for shooting Rose as the unarmed teenager ran away from a traffic stop in June. Rosfeld testified that he thought Rose or another suspect had a gun pointed at him and that he fired to protect himself and the community.“I hope that man never sleeps at night,” Rose’s mother, Michelle Kenney, said of Rosfeld after the verdict, according to the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette. “I hope he gets as much sleep as I do, which is none.”Rose’s family is now pressing ahead with a federal civil rights lawsuit filed against Rosfeld and East Pittsburgh, a small municipality about 10 miles (16 kilometers) from downtown Pittsburgh, where the trial was held.Attorney S. Lee Merritt, who represents Rose’s mother in the litigation, said the verdict was based on Pennsylvania law regarding the use of force that he considers unconstitutional.“The protest is an appropriate response to injustice,” Merritt said, adding that he believes the state law is why jurors reached their verdict of acquittal.He also called the shots at Rosfeld’s attorney’s office “an act of cowardice and barbarism that does nothing but perpetuate the stereotypes often used to justify police brutality.”Thomassey told reporters after the verdict that Rosfeld is “a good man, he is.” The defense attorney said he hopes the city remains calm and “everybody takes a deep breath and gets on with their lives.”The leaders of two major Pittsburgh charities issued a statement expressing “shock and outrage” over the verdict.“Pittsburgh now sadly joins a disturbing and ever-growing catalogue of cases across the United States where law enforcement or security officials have walked free after the killings of young black men under questionable circumstances,” wrote Maxwell King, president and CEO of the Pittsburgh Foundation, and Grant Oliphant, president of the Heinz Endowments.“We have asked the question, ‘Would Antwon Rose be alive today if he had been white?’ We, his family and African American community leaders believe that more than likely he would be.”Pittsburgh was in the spotlight less than five months ago, when a gunman ranting about Jews killed 11 people at a synagogue.Rose was riding in an unlicensed taxi that had been involved in a drive-by shooting minutes earlier when Rosfeld pulled the car over and shot the teenager in the back, arm and side of the face. Neither Rose nor another teen in the taxi was holding a weapon when the officer opened fire, though two guns were later found in the vehicle.Rosfeld had worked for the East Pittsburgh Police Department for only a few weeks and was sworn in just hours before the shooting.The 12-person jury — including three Black members — saw video of the fatal confrontation. The jury took less than four hours to reach a verdict.Prosecutor Jonathan Fodi argued that the video showed there was no threat to the officer. But a defense expert testified Rosfeld was within his rights to use deadly force to stop suspects he thought had been involved in a shooting.The prosecution did not call its own use-of-force expert, a decision the American Civil Liberties Union of Pennsylvania questioned. But Mike Manko, a spokesman for the district attorney’s office, said prosecutors were confident they had what they needed to make their case.Shortly before the traffic stop, another person in the taxi, Zaijuan Hester, rolled down a window and shot at two men on the street, hitting one in the abdomen. Hester, 18, pleaded guilty last week to aggravated assault and firearms violations. He said he, not Rose, did the shooting.Prosecutors had charged Rosfeld with an open count of homicide, meaning the jury had the option of convicting him of murder or manslaughter.___Associated Press journalists Michael Rubinkam in northeastern Pennsylvania, Ramesh Santanam in Pittsburgh and Keith Srakocic in Pittsburgh contributed to this story.last_img read more